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Being Benedictine

Living the Rule of St. Benedict in Daily Life

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Retreats

From Fingerpaints to SoulCollage®: My Creative Kid (Now Adult)

I was absolutely tickled when my daughter, Jessica, asked me to help her with an Environmental Politics project when she was in college. Not only did it focus on SoulCollage®, one of my passions, but she had requested special permission to use a different research idea than those suggested by her professor. I find that kind of creative thinking pretty awesome. But, then, I think she’s a pretty awesome kid (now, adult.)

 

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Jessica creating in elementary school

From finger painting and Play-doh as a toddler to crayons, markers, and watercolor in elementary school and later to SoulCollage®, Jessica has always been willing to try new things. We always had an “art drawer” at our house when Jessica was growing up and an evening at the kitchen table creating was a favorite way for us to spend time together. It has become a form of self-expression, self-understanding, even a way for Jessica to visualize her future.

Rather than putting words in her mouth, though, I wanted to hear from her what she valued about SoulCollage®. Perhaps her words will inspire another child, teen or young woman to express themselves creatively.

Continue reading “From Fingerpaints to SoulCollage®: My Creative Kid (Now Adult)”

Sober and Merciful: St. Benedict’s Journey of Mindfulness

The Tesla Roadster is said to go from zero to 60 miles per hour in 1.9 seconds. Whoa!

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Who really needs to go that fast?! I understand better than most what it is like to be running late, hurrying to my destination and feeling like I need to drive a little faster—I’ve been known to have a lead foot in these cases a few too many times.

But is it smart, safe or the best thing for us and others? We know it is a wiser choice to slooooow down.

move slowly

Likewise, I know all too well about reacting emotionally in challenging situations. My temper can go from zero to 60 in about 2 seconds. It is a benefit to slow down my thoughts, emotions, and reactions a bit to gain a better perspective.

The local, national or global news can cause one’s heart to race, from zero to 60, in the time it takes to read or hear just one reported sentence. It is all too easy to get caught up in the “swirl and chaos of fear, violence, and anger assaulting our world today. Practicing soberness means being detached from emotions, both overly negative or positive feelings. It is not good to be “drunk” on either extreme.” (Discerning Hearts)

Alternatively, we can meet all challenges with an attitude of soberness.

Fr. Mauritius Wilde, Prior of Sant’ Anselmo in Rome and former prior of Christ the King Priory in Schuyler, Nebraska, has a podcast series on the Benedictine understanding of sobriety. He will also return to Nebraska to lead a retreat at St. Benedict Center, March 27-29, 2020 called Sober and Merciful: Saint Benedict’s Journey of Mindfulness. Continue reading “Sober and Merciful: St. Benedict’s Journey of Mindfulness”

Creating Sanctuary: The “Beautiful Ones” Group Card

“Altars can be very powerful…We acknowledge an incarnate God who speaks through symbols and the things of our everyday lives…” -The Artist’s Rule, Christine Valters Paintner

An altar can be a centering, focal point for group or personal prayer or creativity. The altar placed in the center of our creative space during the Sprigs of Rosemary Advent Retreat held symbols of the season and the retreat—an advent wreath surrounded by fresh rosemary and a rosemary candle.

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Throughout the retreat, more symbols were added.  Each woman placed SoulCollage® cards they had made over the days as well as offering a single image that resonated with them that later I would create into a group card—something I’ve never done before. For the closing session, each woman lit their own rosemary candle from the larger candle and special blessings were shared.

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Symbols and rituals create pathways in our hearts and minds, allowing us to carry meaningful experiences with us into our ordinary lives. Creating our group card was one such experience. With permission from the Beautiful Ones, a term of endearment coined by Sara—a dear friend and retreat participant—find reflections and I Am One Who Statements from some of our group.

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Betty shared—“There was a bond formed within this retreat of Beautiful Ones that will keep us united eternally. Christ sat with us the entire time. I’m still at a loss to describe how this retreat touched and changed me.  I only know since the card reading, I have learned more about myself and my relationship with God.  Both have deepened to a level I have never experienced. I really can’t find words to express what is differentinner confidence I’ve lacked, acceptance of physical issues, but most of all a deepening in my trust of my Lord. My mantra, Jesus I trust in you is going to depths I never expected.  Continue reading “Creating Sanctuary: The “Beautiful Ones” Group Card”

Sprigs of Rosemary—A SoulFully You Online Advent Retreat (Closing Session)

This session closes our Advent retreat, Sprigs of Rosemary—a retreat that can be adapted to any schedule and, certainly, can be used any time of the year. This final post recognizes that YOU are a temple of God, a home for God in the world, the ultimate sanctuary for the Divine.nativity

Advent leads us from the darkness of the womb to the light of Christ at Christmas. As we journey through the weeks, we circle the Advent wreath lighting a new candle each week—a reminder that our waiting ends, that Christ will come. But it can also set our intention to be a dwelling place for God, to remind ourselves that Christ is incarnated in us. “Sanctuary” by Maranatha Music is a prayerful reminder:

Lord, prepare me to be a sanctuary
Pure and holy, tried and true
With thanksgiving, I’ll be a living
Sanctuary for You
Continue reading “Sprigs of Rosemary—A SoulFully You Online Advent Retreat (Closing Session)”

Sprigs of Rosemary—A SoulFully You Online Advent Retreat (Session 4)

Welcome to Session 4—Friendship as Sanctuary.

It is so important to cultivate sacred friendships, to make space for people to experience giving and receiving the unconditional love that God extends to us.

Soul friends, or anam caras, can bring us joy, humor, understanding, compassionate listening, comfort, or consolation—and the intuition to know what we need sanctuary from. For nearly 17 years, I have met with a circle of friends to read and discuss spiritual books. We have gone through several iterations as members have, sadly, passed away, moved away or moved on, but we provide sanctuary for each other that I am grateful I can count on. 

 Consider the story of the Visitation. 

In those days Mary set out and went with haste to a Judean town in the hill country, where she entered the house of Zechariah and greeted Elizabeth.  —Luke 1:39–40 Continue reading “Sprigs of Rosemary—A SoulFully You Online Advent Retreat (Session 4)”

Sprigs of Rosemary—A SoulFully You Online Advent Retreat (Session 2)

In Session 1, we contemplated the lyrics of Sanctuary, written by Carrie Newcomer, and explored the power of images to tap into our intuition through collage. Expressing one’s creativity allows time and space for new ideas to bubble up, for questions to surface, and for meaning to take hold.

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“Images attract the attention of the right side of our brains, and when there are only images, this intuitive side stays in charge and will go deeper into the uncharted territory of the psyche. It is this side of our brain that can see the whole picture at once and surprise us with wise answers that seem to come from some deeper place.” Seena Frost, SoulCollage Evolving

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My Sanctuary Card

Contemplative Session 2: Sanctuary in Thin Places

The Caim
Symbols, as with images, can represent something beyond a surface level of understanding, pointing to the abstract. Symbols can become an important part of rituals, helping cement an idea or intention and give energy to creativity and prayer.

While researching sanctuary as a theme for this retreat, I discovered two symbols that illuminated the notion of creating sanctuary. The first is the Celtic Christian symbol, caim.  A caim can be practiced as a ritual of circling oneself with prayerful protection in dark times. There is a power in a symbol that embraces its meaning and yet goes beyond—it can be a reminder of being loved and safe during times when one feels uncertainty.

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“The “caim” involves simply drawing a circle around yourself or another person physically or in your imagination. This encircling prayer is grounded in our awareness of the constant companionship and protection of the divine. It reminds us that God is in this place. Often, as they embarked on journeys or felt at risk, Celtic pilgrims would inscribe a circle around themselves as a reminder of God’s ever-present companionship and protection.

Practicing the encircling prayer is simple. Pause and then take a moment to draw a holy circle around yourself or, imaginatively, around a loved one. Use your index finger as a way of inscribing the circle around you. As you draw the protective circle, you may use a traditional or contemporary prayer of encircling. You may also choose to write and read your own personal prayer for yourself or another. But, in any case, the power of a spiritual tradition often finds its most lively expression when we embody it from our deepest spirit and in the language of our own hearts.” Continue reading “Sprigs of Rosemary—A SoulFully You Online Advent Retreat (Session 2)”

Sprigs of Rosemary—A SoulFully You Online Advent Retreat (Session 1)

Sprigs of Rosemary—A SoulFully You Online Advent Retreat

Over the next several days, I will share excerpts from a recent Advent retreat I was honored to lead. Ten women joined me on a journey to explore the significance of seeking, being and finding sanctuary.

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The inspiration for the retreat came from the lyrics of this song, Sanctuary by Carrie Newcomer.

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Sanctuary was written by Carrie Newcomer after a conversation with her friend Parker J. Palmer.  She asked him, “What can we do when we are personally or politically heartbroken?” He responded that we take sanctuary. We gather with those we love.  We remember, we share stories or we sit in silence until we can go on. There is time for positive action, to do what needs to be done, but there are also times when we rest in the arms of what most sustains us.

The retreat, Sprigs of Rosemary, was an opportunity to creatively and prayerfully ponder what sustains us—a special time to gather with kindred spirits and create our own sanctuary. Consider asking a circle of friends to join you for this online contemplative retreat…or if that doesn’t work, simply carve out time for yourself, a little each day, to practice Lectio Divina with song lyrics, poetry or scripture and to express yourself creatively through SoulCollage®.

Contemplative Session 1: Listen to Sanctuary by Carrie Newcomer.

Practice Lectio Divina with the lyrics of this song. What words or phrases speak to your heart? Do any of these words or phrases resonate with you?

Refuge (safe, rest, quiet)   —   Haven in the storm   —   Fire (all but gone, embers warm) —   Sprigs of Rosemary (remember)   —   Sanctuary   —   Carry on   —   Knees (ground, dropped me)   —   Us and them —   Circle of friends

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Consider what SANCTUARY means to you.

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What do you think is the significance of SPRIGS OF ROSEMARY? Consider some of the historical uses of rosemary. Continue reading “Sprigs of Rosemary—A SoulFully You Online Advent Retreat (Session 1)”

The Gospels: The Story of Jesus

God does so much and asks so little

god does so much

The past several days I have read all four Gospels of the New Testament—Matthew, Mark, Luke, AND John. And not just the miracles or the well-known parables, but from beginning to end; every chapter, every verse. And for each of the Gospels, I’ve also read a chapter in my textbook, The New Testament by Stephen L. Harris, for a class I’m taking at Creighton University. Each chapter comments on key topics, themes, author, date and place of composition, various sources used, the intended audience and interpretations.

I don’t have the words yet for all that I’ve learned, but that’s also why I’m procrastinating. I need to find some words (very soon) to write an 1800 word paper, due in 48 hours, responding to this prompt: Explain the story of the life of Jesus as portrayed in the Gospel of John, and compare it to either Matthew or Luke and how this might relate to ministry today.

I trust the words will come, but this first. Here goes….

Surprisingly (to me) each of the four Gospels share a unique portrayal of Jesus, his life, death, resurrection, and ultimate purpose of all of the above. Ninety percent of the content in the Gospel of John is not in the other three synoptic Gospels. Who knew?

Luke vs. John: An 1800ish word paper

the wordA few of you asked to read the paper…and now that it is graded (94%), I feel confident enough to share the-just-shy-of-1800-words that I wrote.  I would love to hear what you think, whether you have ever read all four Gospels in their entirety, and what resonates most with your spirituality.

Jodi Gehr
Word Count: 1794

Each of the Gospels contributes to an understanding of who Jesus is. The Gospel of Luke shares Jesus as bringing a universal faith under the direction of the Spirit; John focuses on the power and divinity of Jesus to confer salvation and immortality (Harris 110, 189). The themes, characters, teachings and post-resurrection interpretations for each of the gospels support these unique aspects of Jesus. The relationship between John and Luke could be stated: the Johannine Jesus shows who God is while Luke shows people how to be God-like in their lives.

The Gospel of John, written between 90-100 CE, is a cosmic and theological, rather than historical, representation of Jesus (Harris 249-250). John portrays Jesus as the incarnation of divine Wisdom, born to overcome darkness, evil and chaos, bring light into the world and offer salvation (Brubacher, Jesus; Harris 250, 259). Exclusive to John, Jesus is revealed as the Word, or Logos translated in Greek, “When all things began, the Word already was. The Word dwelt with God, and what God was, the Word was. (John 1:1)” Jesus pre-existed, “In the beginning God created heaven and earth (Gen 1:1, Harris 259).” The Wisdom tradition united with Greek philosophy places Jesus existing, in cosmic order, at the beginning of the universe, cooperating with Yahweh before his incarnation (Harris 249, 259).

Greek and Jewish Wisdom literature, the hypothetical Signs Gospel, and oral teachings of the “Beloved Disciple” were sources that “John”, likely anonymous, used to reach a broad audience. Because of tension between Torah loyalists and Jesus followers, Christians were excluded from synagogues; for Christianity to be a sustainable religion, casting a wider evangelical net was imperative (Harris 250, 253). John also confronted the disappointment of Jesus’ original followers when an imminently predicted second-coming was not realized and to provide encouragement for believers who hoped a Messiah would save them from hardships (Brubacher, Jesus; Harris 250).

Ninety percent of John’s content is not in other gospels (Harris 113). Divided into two sections—the Book of Signs, seven miracles of Jesus; the Book of Glory, Jesus’ death as glorious, fulfillment of divine will, its Christology states Jesus and the Holy Spirit are one; after Jesus’ death and resurrection, the Holy Spirit takes his place (14:26). Jesus proclaims, “I am the bread of life (6:35), the good shepherd (10:11), the resurrection and the life (11:25), the way, the truth and the life (14:6, Harris 260-262).”  Jesus, with authority and “equality with God” gives a new commandment to love one another (13:34-3). Jesus’ dying on the cross demonstrates the ultimate act of love.

The Synoptic Gospels, narratives of the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus, focus on Torah reinterpretation (Harris 249). The Gospel of Luke, specifically, was written around 85-90 CE (Harris 192). Luke, “the beloved physician”, did not know Jesus and is likely anonymous.  Luke’s goal was to write a well-researched gospel, “going over the whole course of these events in detail (1:1-4).” Luke was written to convince Jews and Gentiles to believe in Jesus as universal savior, a familiar role appropriated to gods and human rulers (Harris 190-191).  Luke’s message is intended to guide all—men, women, rich, poor, and especially those disadvantaged—to salvation (Brubacher, Jesus).  Luke’s gospel, most inclusive to women,  gives prominent “roles” to Jesus’ mother, Mary, who proclaimed the Magnificat (1:46-55) and was with Jesus at his death (Harris 196, 270). In the story of Mary and Martha, Mary was encouraged to equally participate with men listening to Jesus’ teaching (Harris 206). And Mary Magdalene alone discovers the empty tomb upon Jesus’ resurrection (Harris 270). The Lukan Jesus is concerned with social and economic justice, for the poor, social outcasts and women (Harris 193).

Luke provides a “connected narrative” of events in Jesus’ life, fulfilling prophecies in Hebrew scripture, securing a role in salvation history for Israelites, and revealing a new covenant to Gentiles (Harris 190, 201). Jesus as Son of Man is Messiah for Jews and Savior for all (9:22), forgives sins (5:24), must suffer (19:20), die and be judge of all (Harris 198, 201).  Luke uses the Hebrew Bible, Lukan sources, Mark, and Q, a document portraying Jesus as wisdom teacher and prophet (Harris 157). Luke goes a step further than John with a commandment to love not just one’s friends, but enemies as well (6:27).

From Jesus’ conception through the resurrection, each of the gospels concentrates on aspects that reinforce its impression of Jesus. Luke shares Mary receiving news from the angel Gabriel to announce she is expecting and the visitation between Mary and her cousin, Elizabeth, where unborn John leaps in anticipation of Mary’s child, Jesus (Harris 200). Unlike other gospels, Luke traces Jesus’ genealogy back to Adam rather than Abraham, symbolizing Jesus as savior for all (Harris 190). In John there is no birth story; the pre-existence of Jesus establishes his divinity and makes irrelevant Jesus’ conception (Harris 253). Also only in Luke: the boyhood story of Jesus lost in the temple (Harris 201); the depiction of John the Baptist’s parents, likened to Hebrew’s Abraham and Sarah; and John as the returned Elijah, messenger of a new covenant, “Until John, it was the Law and the prophets (16:16; Harris 191).” In John, there is no baptism of Jesus and the role of the Baptist is only to introduce Jesus as the Lamb of God and to foreshadow the importance of who Jesus is (1:6-9, 19-36). The Lukan Jesus is historical, Johannine Jesus is divine from the start.

In Luke, Jesus teaches using parables; in John, lengthy speeches (Harris 254). In Luke, Jesus is empowered by the same inspiration as Israel’s prophets—portrayed as a gentle, serving Jesus, concerned for the poor, outcast, and powerless, showing compassion, offering comfort and forgiveness (22: 24-27; Harris 193, 204). Jesus practices his commandment to “love one’s enemies” by visiting Samaritans, typically hated by Jews (9:52-56; Harris 205). In the Sermon on the Plain, the Lukan Jesus, concerned with social justice, makes real the importance of the poor and hungry; not metaphorical Beatitudes as in Matthew (Harris 202). In the story of the Good Samaritan, Jesus commands his followers “love their neighbor”. When questioned about what the Torah means by one’s neighbor, Jesus notes that one who is different from us racially or religiously, may be capable of human kindness and is our neighbor (Harris 205). One must leave all wealth and power behind to follow Luke’s Jesus (6:24). Only in Luke are the stories of the prodigal son, the lost coin, the Good Samaritan, Lazarus and the rich man shared focusing on unexpected reversals and forgiveness of wrongdoers (Harris 207). Luke focuses on Jesus’ humanity, even tempted by Satan, as a role model for others. It is with the transfiguration when his divinity is revealed (Harris 112, 212).

In Luke, Jesus embodies the compassion, mercy and unconditional forgiveness of God, so it is no surprise when Pope Francis declared 2016 the Jubilee Year of Mercy, he quotes Luke 6:36 in which Jesus tells his disciples, “Be merciful as your Father is merciful.” Pope Francis states, “we are all called to give consolation to every man and every woman of our time (Harris, Pope).

John focuses Jesus’ ministry around seven signs, or miracles. For example, one significant sign is the dialogue with Nicodemus on spiritual rebirth illuminating Jesus’ purpose as seen by John, to save the world (3:16).  Additionally, the raising of Lazarus, the most spectacular miracle, demonstrates Jesus’ power over life and death, “I am the resurrection and I am life. If a man has faith in me, even though he die, he shall come to life; and no one who is alive and has faith shall ever die” (11:25) and also foreshadows his own death and resurrection (Harris 266-67).

A distinct difference between Luke and John is the Last Supper. In Luke, a more traditional version of the Eucharist, Jesus does not refer to wine as his blood; he is never considered a sacrificial atonement for sins as other Synoptic gospels (Harris 213). In John, Jesus was already referred to as “heavenly bread”; he comes as servant instead by washing the feet of his disciples (13:3-17; Harris 268).

In Luke, Pilate testifies to Jesus’ innocence; still, he is sentenced to death. Only in Luke is Jesus the model of forgiveness, breaking the cycle of hatred and retaliation that brings evil in the world, “Father forgive them; they do not know what they are doing (Harris 214).” Confident already as eschatological judge, Jesus confirms the felon next to him will also be in paradise (Harris 271). Jesus relinquishes his spirit, “Father into your hands I commit my spirit (23:34).”

In John the crucifixion is not humiliating, Jesus alone makes the decision to give up his life (10:17-18) accepting a glorified return to heaven and the descent of the Holy Spirit. In John there are no prophecies of a second coming, rather the risen Christ is eternally present with the Holy Spirit, a “realized eschatology” where eternal life is fully available now demonstrated by Jesus’ last words, “It is accomplished”. (14:1-3, 25-26; Harris 250, 255, 275). Luke suggests Jesus is present in Christian practices after the resurrection, but John goes farther—the Paraclete as substitute for Jesus, equal with God (8:58), provides the framework for the later Trinity doctrine (Harris 276). In Luke, as Jesus triumphs over death, Mosaic law is fulfilled and a new evangelization is called for (24:36-53). The Holy Spirit, referred to fourteen times in Luke, far more than other gospels, is the initiator in Jesus’ life from conception to baptism, in the wilderness to his ministry in Galilee. The Spirit is present in prayer and at his death (Harris 193). Luke briefly mentions a second coming of Jesus, but it is considered to be unexpected and unpredictable, instead focusing on growing the community of believers (Harris 211).

Using various gospels in ministry allows a focus on the characteristics of Jesus that apply to personal situations. Not one gospel is able to fully understand who the Jesus of humanity or divinity is—language is limited, understanding is incomplete. Having four gospels written at different times, towards unique audiences, with various purposes and themes allows us to see Jesus in every new and changing ways, applicable to being Christian in daily life.

Works Cited

Brubacher, G. (2017).  Jesus of Nazareth: Selected Teaching. Unpublished manuscript, Department of Theology, Creighton University, Omaha, Nebraska.

Brubacher, G. (2017). Meta-narrative of the New Testament: The Jesus Movement Era. Unpublished manuscript, Department of Theology, Creighton University, Omaha, Nebraska.

Harris, Elise.  Pope Francis declares Holy Year for Mercy. Catholic News Agency. Rome, Italy. March 13, 2015.

Harris, Stephen L. The New Testament: A Student’s Introduction. 7th ed. New York: McGraw Hill, 2012. Print

Many Ways to Pray: Walking a Labyrinth

“There are hundreds of ways to kneel and kiss the ground.” –Rumi

There are many ways to pray—in song, spoken or written words, silence, creativity, nature and movement, just to mention a few. Paul recommends to “pray without ceasing” (1 Thessalonians 5:17), which is only possible if we are able to connect with our Creator in a variety of ways. We are meant to engage our senses, our whole bodies, in prayer.

I’ve come to appreciate this about the Catholic Mass, even if visitors might think there is a lot of up and down. We genuflect, sit, stand, kneel and bow. These gestures, postures or movement help to bring our whole being into prayerful expression—raising our hands when saying the “Our Father”, making the sign of the cross or receiving the Eucharist allows us to use our bodies in prayer.

lab signIn addition, walking the stations of the cross or a labyrinth, taking a nature hike, or practicing yoga or tai chi are prayerful forms of movement that engage our bodies while quieting our mind. Going away on retreat is an opportunity to explore and practice various forms of prayer.

St. Benedict Center is building a labyrinth modeled after the famous labyrinth in the Cathedral of Chartres, France.  “When the Holy Land was closed to pilgrims in the Middle Ages, labyrinths abounded in the churches of Europe.  They were used to symbolically represent the pilgrimage to the Holy Land.  Our life is a pilgrimage, a journey to our eternal home with God in heaven.” –Father Thomas Leitner The labyrinth will be completed in late summer or fall. 

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This summer I had the opportunity to pray in many ways while attending an eight-day Ignatian retreat at the Creighton University Retreat Center. Each day, for about an hour, I met with a spiritual director to receive guidance and to share my faith journey; the remainder of the day was spent reflecting on these discussions and praying. One of the ways that I prayed was by walking a labyrinth.

“A labyrinth is not a maze. A maze is a symbol of life without meaning, it is an agent of confusion, deception with dead ends that lead you nowhere. But a labyrinth is a symbol of a life of deeper meaning, an on-going sacred journey leading us inward, outward and to greater wholeness.” –Carrie Newcomer Continue reading “Many Ways to Pray: Walking a Labyrinth”

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