How do you stay calm in face of distractions, temptations, a whirling frenzy of activity, either from the outside or within your own spirit?  Sometimes the disturbance is our mind– we just think too much! The Rule of St. Benedict gives guidance to help monks manage the disturbances and confusion that inevitably come. Fr. Mauritius provides some insight on how monks find their way back to peace and tranquility.

Follow the link to Fr. Mauritius’ Wilde Monk blog to read more, but be sure to come back to BeingBenedictine to share your comments.

Consider: Does advice in the Rule apply to the ordinary person’s life? How do you manage disturbances from the outside or from within? How do you find rest and peace in confusing times? 

Saint Benedict wants to provide an environment of peace in which the monks can live without disturbance and confusion. He warns the abbot of the monastery not to be excitable, anxious, or extreme, “because such a man is never at rest.” (Rule of St. Benedict 64:16) “The abbot is not to disturb the flock entrusted to him nor make any unjust arrangements, as though he had the power to do whatever he wished.” (63:2) He warns also the bursar: “As cellarer of the monastery, there should be chosen from the community someone who is wise, mature in conduct, temperate, not an excessive eater, not proud, not excitable, offensive, dilatory or wasteful, but God-fearing, and like a father to the whole community, (…) so that no one may be disquieted or distressed in the house of God.” (31:1-2.9) Not only superiors can disturb the community of a monastery, but also guests who come and “make excessive demands that upset the monastery.” (61:2) Even the heat of the summer, according to St. Benedict, can confuse the monks (cf 41:2).

How can we return to peace? Often the disturber comes from outside. But even more often he comes from the inside, from our own heart. If something unclean comes from outside, it has no chance to affect me if I keep calm with Christ. As soon as I get drawn into the whirl, being in favor, being against, planning strategies… I have already been affected, and have become part of the confusion. Certainly, I cannot do nothing. The disturbance I perceive is a fact I have to deal with and must respond to.  

Read more of Fr. Mauritius blog post, herecapture

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